Syllabus

DESCRIPTION: This course intends to offer students an insight on American history and culture both in international and transnational perspective. The role played by the United States in international affairs in the 20th century is such that scholars have come to label the intervening period between the Spanish-American War and the end of the Cold War, the American Century. Actually, the U.S. still plays a major role in international relations while its position and interaction with the rest of the world was already prominent in the 19th century. Moreover, U.S. history, like the history of other countries, was forged by the country’s interaction with other parts of the world and by the inevitable transnational connections with other nations. The course therefore offers an interpretation of American history in a transnational perspective while familiarizing the students with some of the major historians of the past century and with the more recent historiography, methodology and critical analyses of American history.

NUMBER OF CREDITS:  8

 

INSTRUCTOR: Daniele Fiorentino

METHOD OF PRESENTATION: Lectures, projections, library work, research hands on, critical in class discussion of the assigned readings.

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

The course aims at providing students with a critical thinking of the United States in the last hundred years and of the contemporary world as seen from the American perspective. International studies today entail a good understanding of American culture and history: both because of the nation’s role worldwide and because the new methodologies in cultural and transnational studies developed in the United States, especially in the second half of the 20th century. Therefore, by the end of the course, students will be knowledgeable about the major aspects of U.S. history in the last 150 years both at the domestic and international level. Moreover, they will acquire an understanding of the major methodologies used by American scholars to study their country in transnational and international perspective.

 

REQUIRED WORK AND FORM OF ASSESSMENT: Attendance and participation (20%); mid-term written test (25%); in class oral presentation (30%); in class final (25%). The mid-term and the final consist of IDs and short essays based on the lectures and the two books indicated in the required readings section. The presentations and following class discussion concentrate on the essays indicated in the required readings section. Access to this material can be either obtained through the online subscriptions of our university or through the electronic resources offered by the Centro Studi Americani. In the second week of class, the professor will explain how to prepare for the presentations, which will take place toward the end of the course. In order to approach the methodological discussion in the best way possible, the class will take two field-studies in the libraries of the Department and of the Center of American Studies.

CONTENT:

PART I – Introduction, methodologies and major issues.

Weeks 1-2

Introduction and description of the course: methodological issues and new approaches to U.S. History. From exceptionalism to transnational history.  The foundations of American democracy: the Constitution and its current value. Universal values and their domestic implementation.

Weeks 3-4

The United States and the world: isolationism and internationalism in historical perspective. From the War of Independence to the War on Iraq.

(In the third week the class will visit the Department Library and will familiarize with paper and electronic reference material)

 

PART II

The United States’ rise to world power

Week 5

The American century: from the Spanish-American War to 9/11.  World War I, the United States’ rise to global power. Rooseveltian or Wilsonian century?

Week 6

The progressive legacy: Reform and the role of the State in the age of empires and totalitarian states.

(In the sixth week the class will visit the Library of the Center of American Studies and will familiarize with paper and electronic reference material)

Week 7

Booms, busts and reforms. From WWI to the Cold War: American domestic policy and economic transformation.

Weeks 8

Democracy, liberalism and the world. American civil rights and human rights in the world.

 

PART III

A short American Century?

Weeks 9-10

From the struggle on civil rights to the students’ revolts and Vietnam. The crisis of the American model. The 1960s and 1970s.

Week 11

The end of the Cold War: what role for the United States? Reagan, the implosion of the Soviet Union and the new relations with Europe and Asia.

Week 12

Toward the 21st century and beyond. 9/11, new challenges, renewed wars and the new interpretations of American history and global role. Preparing for the 2016 presidential elections.

 

ATTENDANCE POLICY :

Attendance is mandatory for all classes. If a student misses more than three classes, 2 percentage points will be deducted from the final grade for every additional absence. Any exams, tests, presentations, or other work missed due to student absences can only be rescheduled in cases of documented medical emergencies or family emergencies.

 

REQUIRED READINGS:                       

Joshua Freeman, American Empire: The Rise of a Global Power, the Democratic Revolution at Home, 1945-2000 (New York: Penguin, 2013).

Richard Hofstadter, The Age of Reform (New York: Vintage, 1955) (or any later edition).

 

The Constitution of the United States of America. http://archives.gov/exhibits/charters/ constitution.html

For the in class discussion and presentations, students can choose one among the following six essays:

Thomas Bender, “The Boundaries and Constituencies of History,” American Literary History, Vol. 18, No. 2 (Summer, 2006), pp. 267-282 + “Global History and Bounded Subjects: A Response to Thomas Bender” by Peter Fritzsche, American Literary History, Vol. 18, No. 2 (Summer, 2006), pp. 283-287

David Ekblad , “Meeting the Challenge from Totalitarianism: The Tennessee Valley Authority as a Global Model for Liberal Development, 1933–1945,” International History Review, 32 (March 2010), pp. 47–67.

David A. Hollinger, “How Wide the Circle of the “We”? American Intellectuals and the Problem of the Ethnos since World War II,” The American Historical Review, Vol. 98, No. 2 (Apr., 1993), pp. 317-337.

Hilde E. Restad, “Old Paradigms in History Die Hard in Political Science: US Foreign Policy and American Exceptionalism,” American Political Thought, Vol. 1, No. 1 (May 2012), pp. 53-76.

Ian Tyrrell, “Reflections on the transnational turn in United States history: theory and practice.” Journal of Global History (2009) 4, pp. 453–474.

Thomas W. Zeiler, “The Diplomatic History Bandwagon: A State of the Field,” The Journal of American History, Vol. 95, No. 4 (Mar., 2009), pp. 1053-1073.

 

RECOMMENDED READINGS:

Amitav Acharya, The End of the American World Order  (Polity Press, 2014).

Bacevich, Andrew, The New American Militarism: How Americans Are Seduced by War (Oxford, New York:  Oxford University Press, 2006).

Belmonte, Laura, Selling the American Way: U.S. Propaganda and the Cold War (Philadelphia:

University of Pennsylvania Press, 2008).

Bender, Thomas, A Nation among Nations: America’s Place in the World (New York:  Hill and Wang, 2006).

Borstelmann, Thomas The Cold War and the Color Line (Cambridge: Harvard University Press,

2003).

Brooks, Stephen and William Wohlforth, America Abroad: The US Global Role in the 21st century,         (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016).

de Grazia, Victoria, Irresistible Empire: America’s Advance Through Twentieth-Century Europe,

(Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2005).

Gerstle, Gary,  American Crucible: Race and Nationalism in the Twentieth Century  (Princeton

University Press, 2001).

Hunt, Michael, Ideology and U.S. Foreign Policy (New Haven: Yale Univ. Press, 1987).

Ikenberry, John Liberal Leviathan: The Origins; Crisis and Transformation of the American World           Order, (Princeton University Press, 2011)

Jackson Lears, T.,  Rebirth of a Nation: The Making of Modern America (New York: Harper Colins, 2010).

Kennedy, David M., Freedom from Fear: The American People in Depression and War, 1929-    1945 (Oxford History of the United States) (Oxford University Press, 2001).

Perlstein, Rick, The Invisible Bridge: The Fall of Nixon and the Rise of Reagan (New York: Simon & Schuster, 2015).

Rodgers, Daniel, Atlantic Crossings: Social Politics in a Progressive Age (New York: Belknap, 2000).

CFU: 8

Il corso affronta temi legati tanto alla storia che alla politica e alle istituzioni americane, con particolare riferimento alla Dichiarazione di Indipendenza e alla Costituzione degli Stati Uniti. La loro centralità nell’esperienza politica e sociale statunitense è oggi ancor più rilevante dopo una delle più tese e discusse elezioni presidenziali che ha aperto un dibattito dentro e fuori il paese sulla solidità delle istituzioni. In classe si affronteranno in particolar modo le funzioni e i doveri del presidente e i meccanismi del sistema istituzionale in prospettiva storica. Alla fine del semestre, gli studenti dovranno conseguire una buona conoscenza degli aspetti salienti della storia americana con l’approfondimento di alcuni momenti determinanti dell’esperienza nazionale e della politica estera americana. In questa analisi si terrà presente la trasformazione del concetto di libertà che già dal XIX secolo fu una bandiera dell’affermazione continentale e internazionale degli Stati Uniti.

In classe si discuterà inoltre dei concetti di libertà e democrazia con particolare riferimento alla Dichiarazione di Indipendenza e alla Costituzione, e poi alla storia del Novecento per ricostruire le fasi salienti della vita culturale e politica del paese. Si metteranno a confronto momenti storici determinanti nella formulazione dell’identità americana con particolare riferimento alla fondazione della nazione, alle trasformazioni dell’Ottocento e al ruolo del paese tra la seconda metà del XX secolo e il nuovo millennio .

Valutazione. Per i frequentanti la valutazione si basa su due prove: una scritta, consistente in un test in classe (a metà semestre) proprio sui due documenti fondamentali degli Stati Uniti che verranno letti e discussi durante le lezioni. La seconda è la prova orale finale negli appelli regolari di fine corso. Gli studenti frequentanti sono invitati a partecipare alla discussione in maniera attiva. A fine corso il docente indicherà chi tra loro può sostenere l’esame finale da frequentante sulla base delle presenze e della partecipazione.

 NB: Si intendono studenti frequentanti coloro che partecipano almeno al 70% delle lezioni.

 

 Il corso si articola secondo il seguente programma:

 Marzo

Prima settimana: introduzione al corso e illustrazione dei principali temi trattati. Istituzioni ed elezioni in prospettiva storica.

Seconda settimana: Le elezioni: il congresso e le sue funzioni. Discussione sui compiti e ruoli dei tre organi del governo.

Terza settimana: La politica americana oggi e le sue radici storiche. Profilo dei due partiti principali. La Costituzione.

Quarta Settimana: La Dichiarazione di Indipendenza e la Rivoluzione.

 

Aprile

Prima settimana: L’Ottocento. Federazione, Unione, Nazione. La società e la politica americane e la loro trasformazione.

Seconda settimana. La Guerra Civile e la Ricostruzione.

Terza settimana: Il ruolo degli Stati Uniti a livello internazionale tra la seconda metà dell’Ottocento e inizio Novecento.

Quarta settimana: L’età progressista e la Prima guerra mondiale.

 

Maggio

Prima settimana: Gli anni venti e trenta. Franklin Delano Roosevelt e il New Deal. La seconda guerra mondiale

Seconda Settimana: Gli USA nella Guerra Fredda. La grande potenza.

Terza settimana: Il movimento dei diritti civili, la crisi degli anni settanta e la trasformazione della società.

Quarta settimana: L’inizio del nuovo millennio. 9/11. L’elezione di Trump e l’eredità della presidenza Obama.

 

Testi:

Eric Foner, Storia della libertà americana, Roma, Donzelli, 2009.

Ferdinando Fasce, I presidenti USA. Due secoli di storia. Roma, Carocci, 2008.

 

La Dichiarazione di indipendenza degli Stati Uniti d’America

La Costituzione degli Stati Uniti d’America.

Testi disponibili in “Materiali didattici” nella pagina docente.

 

Un volume a scelta tra i seguenti:

 

Matteo Battistini, Una Rivoluzione per lo Stato. Thomas Paine e la Rivoluzione americana nel Mondo Atlantico, Soveria Mannelli, Rubbettino, 2012

 Tiziano Bonazzi, Abraham Lincoln. Un dramma americano, Bologna, Il Mulino, 2016.

 Daniele Fiorentino, Gli Stati Uniti e il Risorgimento d’Italia, 1848-1901, Roma, Gangemi, 2013.

 Stefano Luconi, Gli afroamericani dalla guerra civile alla presidenza di Barack Obama, Padova, CLUEP, 2011.

 Marco Mariano, L’America nell’«Occidente». Storia della Dottrina di Monroe (1823-1963), Roma, Carocci, 2013.

 

Gli studenti non frequentanti dovranno inoltre presentare: Tiziano Bonazzi, La Dichiarazione d’Indipendenza degli Stati Uniti d’America, Venezia, Marsilio, 2003 e Robert Dahl, Quanto è democratica la Costituzione americana?, Roma-Bari, Laterza, 2003.

CFU: 8

Il corso affronta temi legati tanto alla storia che alla politica e alle istituzioni americane, con particolare riferimento alla Dichiarazione di Indipendenza e alla Costituzione degli Stati Uniti.  In questo anno di elezioni presidenziali in classe si affronteranno in particolar modo le funzioni e i doveri del presidente e i meccanismi del processo elettorale. Alla fine del semestre, gli studenti dovranno conseguire una buona conoscenza degli aspetti salienti della storia americana con l’approfondimento di alcuni momenti determinanti dell’esperienza nazionale e della politica estera americana. In questa analisi si terrà presente la trasformazione del concetto di libertà che già dal XIX secolo fu una bandiera dell’affermazione continentale e internazionale degli Stati Uniti.

In classe si discuterà inoltre dei concetti di libertà e democrazia con particolare riferimento alla Dichiarazione d’Indipendenza e alla Costituzione, e poi alla storia del Novecento per ricostruire le fasi salienti della vita culturale e politica del paese. Si metteranno a confronto momenti storici determinanti nella formulazione dell’identità americana con particolare riferimento alla fondazione della nazione, alle trasformazioni dell’Ottocento e al ruolo del paese tra la seconda metà del XX secolo e il nuovo millennio .

 

Valutazione: per i frequentanti la valutazione si basa su due prove: una scritta consistente in una rassegna stampa sulle elezioni presidenziali 2016, basata sui tre principali quotidiani italiani che seguono le presidenziali americane: “La Repubblica”, “Il Corriere della Sera”, “La Stampa”. Periodicamente, in classe, il docente inviterà gli studenti a discutere gli eventi attraverso la stampa. Ciò consentirà quindi di preparare al meglio la relazione finale (tra le 8.500 e le 10.000 battute spazi compresi). Questa dovrà essere consegnata una settimana prima della fine del semestre direttamente al docente; la seconda è la prova orale finale negli appelli regolari di fine corso. Gli studenti frequentanti sono quindi invitati a partecipare alla discussione in maniera attiva. A fine corso il docente indicherà chi di loro può sostenere l’esame finale da frequentante sulla base delle presenze e della partecipazione.

NB: Si intendono studenti frequentanti coloro che partecipano almeno al 70% delle lezioni.

(Gli studenti non frequentanti sosterranno l’esame finale orale al quale dovranno presentare i 2 testi del programma indicati di seguito, i testi della Dichiarazione e della Costituzione, con l’integrazione di: Tiziano Bonazzi, La Dichiarazione d’Indipendenza degli Stati Uniti d’America, Venezia, Marsilio, 2003; Daniele Fiorentino, Gli Stati Uniti e il Risorgimento d’Italia,1848-1901, Roma, Gangemi, 2013.).

 

Il corso si articola secondo il seguente programma:

Marzo

Prima settimana: introduzione al corso e illustrazione dei principali temi trattati. Le elezioni e il Super Tuesday.

Seconda settimana: Le elezioni: il congresso e le sue funzioni. Discussione sulle elezioni presidenziali.

Terza settimana: La politica americana oggi e le sue radici storiche. Profilo dei due partiti principali. La Costituzione.

Quarta Settimana: La Dichiarazione di Indipendenza e la Rivoluzione.

Aprile

Prima settimana: L’Ottocento. Federazione, Unione, Nazione. La società e la politica americane e la loro trasformazione.

Seconda settimana. La Guerra Civile e la Ricostruzione.

Terza settimana: Il ruolo degli Stati Uniti a livello internazionale tra la seconda metà dell’Ottocento e inizio Novecento.

Quarta settimana: L’età progressista e la Prima guerra mondiale.

Maggio

Prima settimana: Gli anni venti e trenta. Franklin Delano Roosevelt e il New Deal. La seconda guerra mondiale

Seconda Settimana: Gli USA nella Guerra Fredda. La grande potenza.

Terza settimana: Il movimento dei diritti civili, la crisi degli anni settanta e la trasformazione della società.

Quarta settimana: L’inizio del nuovo millennio. 9/11. La presidenza Obama. Un’ultima valutazione sull’andamento delle elezioni.

Testi:

Arnaldo Testi, Il secolo degli Stati Uniti, Bologna, Il Mulino, 2008.

Ferdinando Fasce, I presidenti USA. Due secoli di storia. Roma, Carocci, 2008.

 

La Dichiarazione di indipendenza degli Stati Uniti d’America

La Costituzione degli Stati Uniti d’America.

Testi disponibili in “Materiali didattici” nella pagina docente.

Un volume a scelta tra i seguenti:

Matteo Battistini, Una Rivoluzione per lo Stato. Thomas Paine e la Rivoluzione americana nel Mondo Atlantico, Soveria Mannelli, Rubbettino, 2012

Tiziano Bonazzi, Abraham Lincoln. Un dramma americano, Bologna, Il Mulino, 2016.

Daniele Fiorentino, Gli Stati Uniti e il Risorgimento d’Italia, 1848-1901, Roma, Gangemi, 2013.

Stefano Luconi, Gli afroamericani dalla guerra civile alla presidenza di Barack Obama, Padova, CLUEP, 2011.

Marco Mariano, L’America nell’«Occidente». Storia della Dottrina di Monroe (1823-1963), Roma, Carocci, 2013.

Gli studenti non frequentanti dovranno inoltre presentare: Tiziano Bonazzi, La Dichiarazione d’Indipendenza degli Stati Uniti d’America, Venezia, Marsilio, 2003 e Le crisi transatlantiche. Continuità e trasformazioni, a cura di M. Del Pero e F. Romero, Roma Edizioni di Storia e Letteratura, 2007, Introduzione e pp. 45-132.

 

Description: This course intends to offer students an insight on American history and culture both in international and transnational perspective. The role played by the United States in international affairs in the 20th century is such that scholars have come to label the intervening period between the Spanish-American War and the end of the Cold War, the American Century. Actually, the U.S. still plays a major role in international relations while its position and interaction with the rest of the world was already prominent in the 19th century. Moreover, U.S. history, like the history of other countries, was forged by the country’s interaction with other parts of the world and by the inevitable transnational connections with other nations. The course therefore offers an interpretation of American history in a transnational perspective while familiarizing the students with some of the major historians of the past century and with the more recent historiography, methodology and critical analyses of American history.

NUMBER OF CREDITS:  8

INSTRUCTOR: Daniele Fiorentino

METHOD OF PRESENTATION: Lectures, projections, library work, research hands on, critical in class discussion of the assigned readings.

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

The course aims at providing students with a critical thinking of the United States in the last hundred years and of the contemporary world as seen from the American perspective. International studies today entail a good understanding of American culture and history: both because of the nation’s role worldwide and because the new methodologies in cultural and transnational studies developed in the United States, especially in the second half of the 20th century. Therefore, by the end of the course, students will be knowledgeable about the major aspects of U.S. history in the last 150 years both at the domestic and international level. Moreover, they will acquire an understanding of the major methodologies used by American scholars to study their country in transnational and international perspective.

REQUIRED WORK AND FORM OF ASSESSMENT: Attendance and participation (20%); mid-term written test (25%); in class oral presentation (30%); in class final (25%). The mid-term and the final consist of IDs and short essays based on the lectures and the two books indicated in the required readings section. The presentations and following class discussion concentrate on the essays indicated in the required readings section. Access to this material can be either obtained through the online subscriptions of our university or through the electronic resources offered by the Centro Studi Americani. In the second week of class, the professor will explain how to prepare for the presentations, which will take place toward the end of the course. In order to approach the methodological discussion in the best way possible, the class will take two field-studies in the libraries of the Department and of the Center of American Studies.

 CONTENT:

PART I – Introduction, methodologies and major issues.

Weeks 1-2

Introduction and description of the course: methodological issues and new approaches to U.S. History. From exceptionalism to transnational history.  The foundations of American democracy: the Constitution and its current value. Universal values and their domestic implementation.

Weeks 3-4

The United States and the world: isolationism and internationalism in historical perspective. From the War of Independence to the War on Iraq.

(In the third week the class will visit the Department Library and will familiarize with paper and electronic reference material)

 

PART II

The United States’ rise to world power

Week 5

The American century: from the Spanish-American War to 9/11.  World War I, the United States’ rise to global power. Rooseveltian or Wilsonian century?

Week 6

The progressive legacy: Reform and the role of the State in the age of empires and totalitarian states.

(In the sixth week the class will visit the Library of the Center of American Studies and will familiarize with paper and electronic reference material)

Week 7

Booms, busts and reforms. From WWI to the Cold War: American domestic policy and economic transformation.

 

Weeks 8

Democracy, liberalism and the world. American civil rights and human rights in the world.

 

PART III

A short American Century?

Weeks 9-10

From the struggle on civil rights to the students’ revolts and Vietnam. The crisis of the American model. The 1960s and 1970s.

 

Week 11

The end of the Cold War: what role for the United States? Reagan, the implosion of the Soviet Union and the new relations with Europe and Asia.

 

Week 12

Toward the 21st century and beyond. 9/11, new challenges, renewed wars and the new interpretations of American history and global role. Preparing for the 2016 presidential elections.

 

ATTENDANCE POLICY :

Attendance is mandatory for all classes. If a student misses more than three classes, 2 percentage points will be deducted from the final grade for every additional absence. Any exams, tests, presentations, or other work missed due to student absences can only be rescheduled in cases of documented medical emergencies or family emergencies.

 

REQUIRED READINGS:                       

Joshua Freeman, American Empire: The Rise of a Global Power, the Democratic Revolution at Home, 1945-2000 (New York: Penguin, 2013).

Richard Hofstadter, The Age of Reform (New York: Vintage, 1955) (or any later edition).

The Constitution of the United States of America. http://archives.gov/exhibits/charters/ constitution.html

 

For the in class discussion and presentations, students can choose one among the following six essays:

 

Thomas Bender, “The Boundaries and Constituencies of History,” American Literary History, Vol. 18, No. 2 (Summer, 2006), pp. 267-282 + “Global History and Bounded Subjects: A Response to Thomas Bender” by Peter Fritzsche, American Literary History, Vol. 18, No. 2 (Summer, 2006), pp. 283-287

 

David Ekblad , “Meeting the Challenge from Totalitarianism: The Tennessee Valley Authority as a Global Model for Liberal Development, 1933–1945,” International History Review, 32 (March 2010), pp. 47–67.

 

John Higham, “The Future of American History,” The Journal of American History, Vol. 80, No. 4 (Mar., 1994), pp. 1289-1309

 

David A. Hollinger, “How Wide the Circle of the “We”? American Intellectuals and the Problem of the Ethnos since World War II,” The American Historical Review, Vol. 98, No. 2 (Apr., 1993), pp. 317-337.

 

Hilde E. Restad, “Old Paradigms in History Die Hard in Political Science: US Foreign Policy and American Exceptionalism,” American Political Thought, Vol. 1, No. 1 (May 2012), pp. 53-76.

 

Thomas W. Zeiler, “The Diplomatic History Bandwagon: A State of the Field,” The Journal of American History, Vol. 95, No. 4 (Mar., 2009), pp. 1053-1073.

 

RECOMMENDED READINGS:

Bacevich, Andrew, The New American Militarism: How Americans Are Seduced by War (Oxford, New York:  Oxford University Press, 2006).

 

Belmonte, Laura, Selling the American Way: U.S. Propaganda and the Cold War (Philadelphia:

University of Pennsylvania Press, 2008).

 

Bender, Thomas, A Nation among Nations: America’s Place in the World (New York:  Hill and Wang, 2006).

 

Borstelmann, Thomas The Cold War and the Color Line (Cambridge: Harvard University Press,

2003).

 

de Grazia, Victoria, Irresistible Empire: America’s Advance Through Twentieth-Century Europe,

(Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2005).

 

Gerstle, Gary,  American Crucible: Race and Nationalism in the Twentieth Century  (Princeton

University Press, 2001).

 

Hunt, Michael, Ideology and U.S. Foreign Policy (New Haven: Yale Univ. Press, 1987).

 

Jackson Lears, T.,  Rebirth of a Nation: The Making of Modern America (New York: Harper Colins, 2010).

 

Kennedy, David M., Freedom from Fear: The American People in Depression and War, 1929-    1945 (Oxford History of the United States) (Oxford University Press, 2001).

 

Perlstein, Rick, The Invisible Bridge: The Fall of Nixon and the Rise of Reagan (New York: Simon & Schuster, 2015).

 

Rodgers, Daniel, Atlantic Crossings: Social Politics in a Progressive Age (New York: Belknap, 2000).

 

Trachtenberg, Alan, The Incorporation of America: Culture and Society in the Gilded Age (New York: Hill and Wang, 2007).

 

 

 

 

DESCRIPTION: The course concentrates on the over 2000 years of history of the Jewish community in Rome. Focusing on the sites of the Roman Jewish experience, from the ancient settlement of Ostia Antica, when the kingdom of Israel was still extant, to the vestiges of the Roman Ghetto and the contemporary districts where Jews now live, the course intends to give students a picture of the actual experience of Roman Jewry. Students will visit the major sites of Jewish life in the city in order to retrace the transformation of the community. The present day community counts about 18,000 members scattered all over the city but still rather cohesive. Touching upon the more general history of Italian Jews, classes will analyze the conditions of present-day Jews while providing the historical background that includes 400 years of Ghetto life, the emancipation of the late 19th century, the fascist racial laws of 1938 and the mass deportation under Nazi rule. A vibrant and active community, today’s Jews constitute probably the “most Roman” community in the city. (3 credits)

INSTRUCTOR: Daniele Fiorentino

METHOD OF PRESENTATION: Lectures, field studies, guest lectures and student presentations.

REQUIRED WORK AND FORM OF ASSESSMENT: Class attendance and participation (20%); midterm (25%); student presentations (25%); final exam (30%).

LEARNING OUTCOMES: By the end of the semester, students have a :

–          general knowledge of Roman and Italian Jewish culture and history;

–          a good understanding of ghetto genesis and life;

–          a good understanding of the major aspects of the Shoah in Italy;

–          a familiarity with major Italian Jewish writers;

–          an ability to identify some major aspects of Judaism, its religion and culture.

CONTENT

PART  I – Introduction: The experience of the oldest diaspora in the world

1) 2000 years of history.  (week 1)

The first meetings provide students with an understanding of the peculiarities of Roman Jewry and their position within Italian Judaism. The first Jews who came to the city were traders and diplomats who worked with the Roman Empire.

2) Sites of Jewish “Romanitas” . (weeks 2-3)

  1. Moving to Rome/Removed to Rome. From trading to deportation. In 70 A.D. with the destruction of the second temple, Jews were taken in chains to Rome by the future Emperor Titus.
  2. Field studies
  3. Ostia Antica.
  4. 2. The Roman Forum and the Arch of Titus.

3) Roman Jews Today. (week 4)

  1. In the course of these meetings, students will learn about the present conditions of Roman Jews: how the community recovered from the destruction operated by Nazi-Fascism, the transformations that took place in the 1960 and 70s, and the significant immigration of Libyan Jews who came to constitute almost a third of the Jewish population in the city. Memory, as in many other Jewish centers, is an important feature of the community. The writings of Primo Levi and Giorgio Bassani contributed to form a post-Shoah  Italian Jewish identity still alive today. The course analyzes this aspect of contemporary life in the Jewish communities of Rome and more in general of Italy.
  2. Field studies
  3. The Marconi-Monteverde District and the Beth Michael Synagogue

PART II –   Struggles for Survival – I

1) From the Fall of the Roman Empire to the end of the Middle Ages. (week 5)

Presents an overview of the history of Italian Jews during a difficult period for the whole country. Rome was sacked repeatedly during the Barbarian invasions but the plight of the Jews was not very different from the one of the rest of the population. In these centuries the Jewish population in the city and across Italy was probably at its lowest.

2) The Ghetto Experience. (weeks 6-7)

  1. This section deals with the first major disruption of Italian Jewry. With the opening of the Inquisition in 1492 and the Council of Trento in the mid-16th century, Jews were persecuted and closed within Ghettos. Roman Jews lived in the ghetto between 1565 and 1870, four hundred years of emargination, insults and forced conversions. This section analyzes the policy of the Catholic Church against the Jews.
  2. Field studies
    1. 1.      The Ghetto (early times)

PART III –  Struggles for Survival – II

1) The Emancipation of Italian and Roman Jews. The Liberal State. (week 8)

The beginning of the emancipation for Italian Jews took place under Napoleon in the early 19th century. The restoration of authoritarian rule and the renewed fragmentation of Italy in small kingdoms and principates brought back ghetto life. The last ghetto to be opened was the one of Rome when the city was annexed to the Kingdom of Italy in 1870, to become its capital.

2) Fascism and Nazi Persecutions. ( weeks 9-10)

After an initial good relationship between Jews and the Fascist Regime, the authoritarian government instituted by Benito Mussolini approved racial laws that ousted Jews from all walks of society. In 1943 the Nazi occupation of the city precipitated Jews in the nightmare of the Shoah. Lectures and readings will provide students with a sense of what it was like to be a Jew in those years.

a. Field studies

The Ghetto and the Major Synagogue (October 16, 1943 Square)

PART IV – Conclusions: Being a Jew in Rome Today.

1) An Orthodox Community ( week 11)

  1. a. Despite all the changes, the Roman Jewish community is one and has no denominations. The Orthodox identity though is not as rigid as it can be in the United States. A rabbi will lecture students on the meaning of the religious experience today.

b. Field Study

Il Pitigliani Jewish Community Center

2) The Relationship with Israel (week12)

The attitude of Italian Jews with Israel is very articulated as it is in other countries. The last two meetings analyze the interaction between the local community and Israel. How this relationship has changed over the years. Although the establishment is very supportive of  Israel, several groups are critical of some Israeli choices and work actively for dialogue between Israelis and Palestinians, considering also the position of Italy in the Mediterranean.

NB: During Field Studies, students will be required to illustrate the sites visited and to analyze their relevance to the history of the Roman Jews and of the city in general. This assignment provides the Student presentation’s 25% of the grade.

REQUIRED READINGS

PART I

http://www.jewishencyclopedia.com/articles/12816-rome

(students may read this on-line article even before the beginning of the course as a general introduction. It is part of the assigned material and will be included in the tests)

Harry J. Leon, The Jews of Ancient Rome: Updated Edition , Hendrickson Publishers, 1995, first 3

chapters.

H. Stuart Hughes, Prisoners of Hope: The Silver Age of the Italian Jews, 1924-1974 , Harvard

University Press, 1996, chapters 3 and 5.

PART II

David Abulafia, Introduction: The Many Italies of the Middle Ages; The Italian Other in
Medieval Italy: Greeks, Muslims and Jews
(2 chaps.) in Italy in the Central Middle Ages, 1000-1300, Oxford History of Italy, 2004, pp. 1-26.

David Kertzer, The Popes Against the Jews: The Vatican’s Role in the Rise of Modern Anti-Semitism, Vintage 2002, Part One.

PART III

The Jews of Italy under Fascist and Nazi Rule 1922–1945, Edited by Joshua D. Zimmerman, Cambridge University Press, 2005, Part One: “Italian Jewry from Liberalism to Fascism;” chapters 1-3 by A. Stille, M. Toscano, G. Fabre.

David Kertzer, The Popes Against the Jews: The Vatican’s Role in the Rise of Modern Anti-Semitism, Vintage 2002, Part Two.

The Jews of Italy under Fascist and Nazi Rule 1922–1945, Edited by Joshua D. Zimmerman , Cambridge University Press, 2005, Part Two: “Rise of Racial Persecution;” chapters 4, 5, 7, 8 by M. Sarfatti, A. Capristo, S. Servi, I. Nidam-Orvieto. Part Three: “Catastrophe – The German Occupation, 1943-1945;” chapters 11, 12  by L. Picciotto, R. Katz. Part IV: chapter 15 by S. Zuccotti.

PART IV

The Jews of Italy under Fascist and Nazi Rule 1922–1945, Edited by Joshua D. Zimmerman , Cambridge University Press, 2005, Part V: “Aftermath: Contemporary Italy and Holocaust Memory;” chapters 16, 17 by A. Bravo, M. Marcus.

RECOMMENDED READINGS

Abrahams, Israel, Jewish Life In The Middle Ages, Kessinger Publishing, 2004.

Bonfil, Roberto, Jewish Life in Renaissance Italy, University of California Press, 2006.

De Felice, Renzo, The Jews in Fascist Italy: A History, Enigma Books, 2001.

Fiorentino, Luca, Il ghetto racconta Roma, Gangemi, 2006 (English Text).

The Jews of Italy under Fascist and Nazi Rule 1922–1945, Edited by Joshua D. Zimmerman , Cambridge University Press, 2005

Levi, Primo, If This is a Man and The Truce, Abacus, 1991.

Momigliano, Arnaldo, Essays on Ancient and Modern Judaism, The University of Chicago Press,

1994.

Sarfatti, Michele, The Jews in Mussolini’s Italy: From Equality to Persecution, University of Wisconsin Press, 2006

Zargani, Aldo, For Solo Violin: A Jewish Childhood in Fascist Italy , Paul Dry Books, 2002.

Zuccotti , Susan, The Italians and the Holocaust: Persecution, Rescue, and Survival, University of        Nebraska Press, 2006.

Zuccotti, Susan, Under His Very Windows: The Vatican and the Holocaust in Italy, Yale University

Press, 2002.

PLEASE NOTE: Students agree that by taking this course all required papers may be subject to submission for textual similarity review to Turnitin.com for the detection of plagiarism.  All submitted papers will be included as source documents in the Turnitin.com reference database solely for the purpose of detecting plagiarism  of such papers.  Use of the Turnitin.com service is subject to the Terms and Conditions of Use posted on the turnitin.com site.”

Continua…

Continua…

Continua…

Docenti  D. Fiorentino e G. Pulcini

A.A. 2011/12

C.F.U. 8

Presentazione e Obiettivi Formativi

Il corso affronta la storia delle relazioni tra Europa e USA nel XX secolo attraverso lo studio della politica estera americana e dei rapporti con le potenze europee, con particolare riferimento  ai primi venti anni del 1900 e alla guerra fredda. Alla fine del corso gli studenti saranno in grado di leggere criticamente alcuni aspetti essenziali dei rapporti transatlantici in quello che va sotto il nome di “secolo americano”. Partendo da un’analisi dell’affermazione degli Stati Uniti a livello internazionale, e soprattutto con la guerra ispano-americana del 1898 che, secondo molti storici, segna il punto di partenza dell’espansione dell’influenza americana a livello mondiale, attraverso la politica di Wilson nel primo conflitto mondiale e l’esperienza degli USA con l’Europa dei regimi nazi-fascisti e nella seconda guerra mondiale, il corso arriva poi ad affrontare il punto nodale della guerra fredda. A questo sono dedicate quasi la metà delle lezioni, che analizzano tanto il confronto con l’Unione Sovietica e la politica dei blocchi, quanto la costruzione della UE e la trasformazione dell’atteggiamento americano nei confronti di un’entità geopolitica inizialmente vista con favore. Particolare attenzione riceverà anche il tema dell’interazione politica e culturale durante la Guerra Fredda: alcune lezioni saranno quindi dedicate alla storia dei movimenti di protesta negli Stati Uniti e in Europa tra gli anni Cinquanta e gli anni Ottanta. Si affronterà infine la questione dell’ “americanizzazione” dell’Europa e il dibattito storiografico sul ruolo degli Stati Uniti nel continente all’indomani della fine della guerra fredda.

Articolazione dell’Insegnamento

Il corso si articola in due moduli per un totale di 8 crediti. Il primo e’dedicato a un’introduzione generale alla storia delle relazioni Europa-USA, con particolare riferimento ai presupposti che contribuirono a caratterizzare tali relazioni nel corso del XX secolo. Il secondo si concentra sulla guerra fredda e sui momenti salienti come la questione di Berlino, la creazione e il ruolo della NATO, i rapporti tra Stati Uniti e Unione Sovietica e lo sviluppo dell’integrazione europea. Il modulo si conclude con una riflessione sulle conseguenze della caduta del muro di Berlino nei dieci anni successivi al 1989.

Programma

1. Partendo da un’analisi della politica estera USA nella seconda metà del XIX secolo, il corso prende in considerazione alcuni momenti salienti dei rapporti Europa-USA, con particolare riferimento alla guerra per Cuba (1898), al Corollario di Roosevelt (1904), alla prima guerra mondiale e al fascismo. In evidenza sono i rapporti con Gran Bretagna, Francia e Italia nella prima metà del XX secolo. La Guerra ispano-americana del 1898 segnò un passaggio importante nei rapporti tra Europa e Stati Uniti mentre la politica di Theodore Roosevelt consolidò la visione USA dell’Europa. La svolta wilsoniana nella I guerra mondiale inaugurò invece una nuova stagione dei rapporti transatlantici che, nonostante la pausa del ventennio fascista, contribuì a ridefinire tanto la visione internazionale quanto i rapporti con le potenze europee per il resto del secolo.

–   I settimana – Introduzione agli argomenti principali delle relazioni Europa-USA.

1. Il 1898. I presupposti.

2.  Theodore Roosevelt e il primo mandato di Wilson

– II settimana.

1. Wilson e la prima guerra mondiale

2. Il Trattato di Versailles e la scelta del Congresso USA

–  III settimana

1. Gli Stati Uniti e il fascismo

2. FDR  e l’ascesa del nazismo

2. Nella seconda metà del Novecento la guerra fredda è stata senza dubbio il tratto caratterizzante dei rapporti Europa-USA. A partire da un’analisi delle immediate ripercussioni del 2° conflitto mondiale  e di Yalta, il corso esamina il confronto sovietico-americano sul continente e le scelte della politica del containment. Una parte delle lezioni di questa seconda parte del corso affrontano anche l’importante questione della costruzione della comunità europea e la posizione degli Stati Uniti in merito. Il post-1989 è una sorta di corollario per comprendere le prospettive delle relazioni transatlantiche.

–      IV settimana – La fine del conflitto e i primi anni della Guerra Fredda:

  1. Il problema della ricostruzione
  2. L’inizio della Guerra Fredda e la questione della Germania

–      V settimana – Il Patto Atlantico, la NATO e i primi passi dell’integrazione europea:

  1. Le origini e i motivi dell’Alleanza Atlantica;
  2. La militarizzazione del Patto: la NATO
  3. L’integrazione europea negli anni cinquanta e il punto di vista degli Stati Uniti

–      VI settimana – La crisi dell’Alleanza negli anni sessanta:

  1. I nodi irrisolti della sicurezza transatlantica;
  2. I progetti di De Gaulle e lo strappo con gli Stati Uniti;
  3. La seconda crisi di Berlino e la stabilizzazione della Guerra Fredda nel continente europeo: L’Europa è ancora centrale per gli USA?
  4. Il movimento pacifista negli Stati Uniti e in Europa: la guerra del Vietnam

–      VII settimana Dalla distensione alla seconda guerra fredda:

  1. L’Ostpolitik e la politica estera di Nixon;
  2. La fine del dollar standard e la crisi energetica;
  3. La crisi della distensione e la vicenda degli euromissili;
  4. Le tensioni transatlantiche e il “nuovo” movimento anti-nucleare durante la prima Amministrazione Reagan

–    VIII settimana – La fine della Guerra Fredda e gli anni novanta:

  1. La fine della Guerra Fredda e le relazioni transatlantiche;
  2. Il ruolo della NATO e la nascita della PESC
  3. Le guerre balcaniche;

IX. settimana

Presentazioni studenti

X settimana

Conclusioni: 1989-2001

Tipologia Didattica

Il corso prevede lezioni frontali e discussione in classe dei testi assegnati. Nelle ultime due settimane gli studenti frequentanti prepareranno delle relazioni di gruppo per approfondire i temi trattati dalle lezioni attraverso alcune monografie indicate di seguito. La presentazione e la discussione di questi testi è parte integrante del lavoro in classe.  Sarà inoltre prevista la visione di film che avranno lo scopo di stimolare la riflessione sui temi affrontati durante il corso.

Note

I partecipanti al corso dovranno presentare una relazione in classe su uno dei testi a scelta che illustrano, secondo punti di vista diversi, le trasformazioni delle relazioni Europa-Stati Uniti. Tutti gli studenti frequentanti dovranno infine sostenere un esame orale sul resto del programma indicato. La valutazione per il voto finale (assegnato comunque in trentesimi), si basa quindi su queste due prove. La prima prova (relazione) si sostiene in classe alla fine del corso e viene svolta a gruppi di tre/quattro studenti. Per frequentanti si intendono gli studenti che hanno seguito almeno il 70% delle lezioni.

Testi Consigliati

Generale:

Mario Del Pero, Libertà e Impero: Gli Stati Uniti e il mondo 1776-2006, Bari, Laterza, 2008 parti  seconda e terza.

Federico Romero e Mario Del Pero, Le crisi transatlantiche: continuità e trasformazioni. Roma, Edizioni di Storia e letteratura, 2007.

Ennio Di Nolfo, Storia delle relazioni internazionali, Bari-Roma, Laterza, pp. 5-151

Acquistabile in linea:

http://digital.casalini.it/editori/default.asp?isbn=9788884983572&tipologia=M#

Per le presentazioni, gli studenti potranno scegliere di discutere in classe uno dei seguenti volumi:

La Feber, Walter, The Cambridge History of American Foreign Relations. Vol. II. The American Search for Opportunity, 1865-1913, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1995.

Lundestad, Geir, The United States and Western Europe since 1945: From “Empire” by Invitation to Transatlantic Drift, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005.

Schmitz, David, The United States and Fascist Italy, 1922-1940, Durham: University of North Carolina Press, 2009.

Trachtenberg, Marc, A Constructed Peace. The Making of the European Settlement, 1945-1963. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1999.

Gli studenti non frequentanti dovranno presentare il programma per frequentanti, compreso uno dei testi a scelta, più il volume:

Giampaolo Valdevit, I Volti della potenza. Gli Stati Uniti e la politica internazionale del Novecento, Roma, Carocci, 2004.

Film:

Il grande dittatore di Charlie Chaplin

Thirteen Days di Roger Donaldson

I due presidenti di R. Loncraine

Continua…